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Archive for October, 2011

Once a year Mexico undergoes a transformation. From the remote islands of Michoacan to Mexico City, people busily prepare for a centuries old celebration known as El Dia de los Muertos, the Day of the Dead. The Day of the Dead celebrations in Mexico are perhaps one of the most bizarre and spectacular events one can be witness to. From its Native American origins to the transformation that the country undergoes in the days preceding the celebration.

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osada’s best known works are his calaveras, which often assume various costumes, such as the Calavera de la Catrina, the “Calavera of the Female Dandy”, which was meant to satirize the life of the upper classes during the reign of Porfirio Díaz. Most of his imagery was meant to make a religious or satirical point. Since his death, however, his images have become associated with the Mexican holiday Día de los Muertos, the “Day of the Dead”.

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Ernesto Hernandez Olmos was born in Oaxaca, Mexico on November 6, 1971. He completed his degree in Art at the School of Fine Arts of the University of Oaxaca, Benito Juarez in 1996. He has also studied sculpture at the Rufino Tamayo School of Art. He has participated in over forty collective exhibits, eight one-man shows, and mural projects. His paintings have been shown at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York in an exhibit on young Oaxacan painters.

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